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South American Real Estate News
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It could be the 1930s all over again for Latin America

During the 1920’s Depression, Latin America was buffeted by a collapse in commodity prices, a slowdown in world trade and a massive capital outflow. The same shocks are hitting the region today, but this time one has to add a decline in remittances (crucial for Central America and the Caribbean) and a productivity freeze, due to having much of the labour force under lockdown. Back then, the economic contraction was brutal. Between 1929 and 1933, output fell by 10 per cent in Argentina and Mexico and by…

Latin American economies in the race to the bottom

Prospects for Latin America are dire this year amid the paralysis in domestic activity; collapse in prices for export commodities; massive job losses; pullback in remittances; rising debt vulnerabilities; and limited scope by governments to adequately respond to the crisis. Consequently, our Consensus Forecast currently sees Latin America’s economy contracting 5.1% this year, which would mark one of the worst contractions in the continent’s history. NUMBER OF THE WEEK – 7% Of the region’s largest…

Latin America’s Wild Economic History, Explained | The Wealth of Nations

The economic history of Latin America is filled with promise and tragedy. From Argentina in 1895 becoming the wealthiest country in the world per capita, to Venezuela in 2019 becoming the human rights crisis in the western world. Latin America is a land of incredible wealth and incredible corruption. Using the data from The Maddison Project and the power of Flourish. Studio’s visualization software, I tell the story of Latin America, from an economic perspective. From 1800 to modern times. This video is a…

Things look increasingly positive for PARAGUAY as growth continues

Things look increasingly positive for PARAGUAY as growth continues Paraguay’s growth estimate is now the highest for the whole of Latin America. With the dreaded Foot and Mouth Disease hitting the country in 2012, coupled with the drought, which caused the government to call for emergency assistance, the year saw a contraction of 0.9%. Since then the situation has been increasingly positive for the South American country. Estimates have been on the increase since 9.5% in October last year following to 10.5%…
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