Fonterra in Chile comes under the spotlight for alleged monopoly business practices

Protestors at a Fonterra plant in southern Chile may have pulled back, but the truce may be short-lived because demonstrators expect dialogue, something Fonterra New Zealand says isn’t happening. The more than 200 members of the Chilterra ( the company has a large New Zealand Shareholding ) workers’ union and indigenous representatives said they lifted the protest because Soprole had agreed to sit down at the table with them. Soprole is owned by Fonterra, and Chilterra ( this company has gone into…

Chilean dairy farmers threaten to break away from New Zealand owned Fonterra Milk Company

Disgruntled Chilean dairy farmers have threatened to stop supplying Fonterra because they say they are being underpaid for their milk. The dairy giant has a 86 percent ownership stake of processing company Prolesur, but some small farmers in southern Chile who supply it are unhappy with their treatment. New Zealand dairy consultant Mike McBeath, who is chairman of Chilean company Chilterra, said it was looking to combine with about 200 farmers to create a rival co-operative. In the last nine years, the Soprole/Prolesur…

Adecoagro buys the Argentine cooperative Sancor Dairy Company

Twelve years after the first attempt, the agro-industrial group Adecoagro is about to get its revenge: it will gain control of the SanCor dairy cooperative, a company of the utmost importance for the Argentine dairy industry. That will be next Thursday when a meeting of farm shareholders of the dairy firm decides as an association whether  Adecoagro can have more than 90% of the assets that are to be transferred. The amount of the transaction is confidential but, according to market sources, the proposal…

How did the New Zealand Milk Exporter Fonterra lose its way

image of Argentina: Los lácteos
Created in 2001, Fonterra was heralded as a ‘breakthrough idea’ meant to help New Zealand ‘catch the knowledge wave’. 14 years on, there’s been no economic transformation, writes Tony Baldwin. Fonterra is confined to segments of business that deliver a return on assets of no more than 5-8%, making it a ‘bottom-feeder’. “Potentially better than an oil well,” boasted Fonterra’s founding chairman, John Roadley, in 2002. “White gold” is another…
Real Estate and Investment News from South America
Visit us on LinkedInVisit us on FacebookVisit us on TwitterVisit us on Pinterest