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Where to live in Buenos Aires?

City of Buenos Aires Real Estate Market Opportunities
What better way can a residential real estate agent truly understand the different neighbourhoods they sell properties in than to live there?  And that is exactly what I did.  I lived in 6 different locations throughout downtown Buenos Aires. As my husband and I were recent “empty-nesters”, we felt the need to downsize our home and improve our quality of life by moving closer to work.  That meant leaving the suburbs for the city, a monumental lifestyle change. We decided the best way to know where you…

Regal Residences Of Yesteryear in Buenos Aires

In the 1920’s Argentina had the 5th largest economy in the world due to the wealth and abundance of its agricultural exports.  During this period, many of the city’s finest buildings were constructed, mainly in the city’s centre and Recoleta. These buildings were built by European architects and modelled predominantly on French-style architecture typically found in Paris.  Many of these beautiful buildings still stand to this day and can be seen all over the city but especially in the Recoleta…

Buenos Aires, city of bookstores

Buenos Aires is a city of bookstores. They can be big and luxurious on the main avenues, discount, or sell antique books in the suburbs. Their appeal to tourists is in the history they represent and the cultural and leisure space they offer. Another interesting feature of many city bookstores is their location in national landmarks. Visiting the bookstores in Buenos Aires, searching their shelves, and talking to their booksellers are ways to know and understand the city and its traditions. Many bookstores…

The future of South American Gauchos with modern farming systems

Gauchos helped defeat Spanish troops and win independence in the 19th century, but the cowboys of lore are no match for today’s soybean boom and factory farms. “The classic gaucho is disappearing,” Lisandro Floral, a 30-year-old who manages a farm of 3,800 hectares (9,400 acres) deep in the Pampas, told AFP. Floral has forsaken the horse and the boleadoras — the traditional rope and leather ball sling used by gauchos to capture running cattle or game — in favor of a 4×4 equipped…

San Rafael, in Mendoza Province, one of the top places in the world for retirement according to CNNMoney

San Rafael, in Mendoza Province, one of the top places in the world for retirement according to CNNMoney In addition to adventure, retirees often find dramatically lower real estate prices. That’s certainly the case in San Rafael, Argentina, a medium-size city in the heart of the nation’s wine country, where the cost of living is about three-fourths that of the U.S. average, according to the Associates for International Research. An hour and a half flight from Buenos Aires, San Rafael has plenty…

Argentine Polo is the latest fashion in China

Argentine Polo is the latest fashion in China Arguably better known for Eva Peron and the tango, Argentina has been a bastion of polo since the sport was popularized there by British settlers in the 19th century. China’s history with the sport goes back even farther: By some accounts, polo was the bees’ knees as far back as the Tang Dynasty (618 – 907 AD), except only imperial types played it. Thought to have originated in China and Persia some 2,000 years ago the British are credited with spreading the…

Buenos Aires booming hotel industry

As the largest city in Argentina, Buenos Aires is home to legendary landmarks, sophisticated entertainment, and noteworthy shopping and dining. But in terms of tourism development, the biggest news of late has come from the local hotel scene. Indeed, Argentina as a whole is Latin America’s standout when it comes to hotel development, with some 15 hotel projects and 1,700 rooms in the pipeline. And Buenos Aires is, of course, the white-hot center of Argentina’s hotel boom. The new hotels apparently aren’t…

Argentine winemakers set sights on Asian markets

Winemakers in Mendoza, where prized Malbec vines grow beneath Andean peaks, celebrated the end of grape-picking this month with a traditional parade of harvest queens and floats laden with flowers. But with festivities over for another year, Argentine vineyards have turned their attention to capturing relatively new Asian markets where burgeoning middle-classes are rapidly acquiring a taste for wine. “Today China consumes less than a liter of wine per person per year,” said Cristina Brachetta, director…
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