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2016 South American Crop Report

image of South American crops
Reports of the grain harvest in South America in 2016 are most satisfactory. Although the realities of the local markets: adverse weather, high input costs and unfavourable exchange rates, do not allow us to say that all crop types have had a good year, on average they did. Below are the details, country by country. Argentina The reality in Argentina is indicated by a boom in sales of agrochemicals, fertilizers, new agricultural machinery, combine harvesters and tractors. In terms of sales of machinery, in…

Trust Code Software prevents Fake Food Scams

New Zealand software has intercepted a batch of fake infant formula with ties to a Russian counterfeiting ring using a new technology called Trust Codes. Trust Codes was developed to tackle the burgeoning market for counterfeit food and has now nabbed its first fraudsters, when the scam was just a few hours old. The software uses QR codes to certify that a product is genuine. When a customer scans a code with their smart phone, the product’s origin and authenticity is instantly verified. If a fake product…

Global Trust in Sustainable Agriculture is the Next big opportunity – Rabobank

The biggest value creation opportunity for those in the  agricultural sector is to be seen as a globally trusted source of sustainably produced products, says a new Rabobank report on the sector ie Sustainable Agriculture. The Sustainable Returns: Finding the value in Environmental Sustainability the  report says improved environmental practices can deliver an immediate monetary benefit, through price premiums, and long-term strategic advantages. Report author Blake Holgate said many consumers now consider…

The 10 most important rules for investing in agriculture

image of Investment in Farmland
Rule 1. Only invest in countries that are investor-friendly: Agricultural investments require a medium to long-term view. A typical investment in mainstream agriculture will require 70-80% of your investment to go into land. There is no need to add to these risks by going into countries where you put your capital at risk. This rules out most of Africa, Eastern Europe and parts of Asia. Rule 2. Countries with low, preferably no, subsidies for agricultural. Subsidies can be alluring because they can be seen…

What does Donald Trump’s election victory means for agriculture ?

Some might say a president who gained power with the motto “drain the swamp” might appear a boon for agriculture. But whether he turns out that way will require a more measured tone by Donald Trump when in office than that he voiced to win power. Sure, farmers may well enjoy something of a honeymoon for now from his victory, which is likely to take the dollar on a weaker course, for now, than it would have done had Mr Trump’s Democrat rival, Hillary Clinton, won the vote. The greenback fell…

Rising Milk demand from China and increasing food safety concerns from New Zealand its major supplier open up opportunities for South America

Rising Milk The worlds largest dairy exporters New Zealand company  Fonterra is calling for improved lab-testing, saying the Government owned Environmental Science & Research laboratories in New Zealand  lacked the capacity to identify an E.coli bacterium in cream. This comes as a French company sues the dairy giant for $500 million, China looks to buy its milk from Germany and South America. Are these food safety issues an opportunity for South America to increase their exports to China ? Worried…

Book for the Week – They Don’t Speak Spanish in Brazil

Book for the Week – They Don’t Speak Spanish in Brazil Simply put, this is the market’s first book for doing business in Brazil. THEY DON’T SPEAK SPANISH IN BRAZIL combines the personal and professional experiences of an American expatriate and a Brazilian native, both successful executives at major multinationals. After twenty years of answering Brazil–related business and legal questions for their colleagues, Joe and Cláudia Low wrote a book that provides the fundamental information…

Why Warren Buffett the worlds 3rd Richest man hates gold as an investment

Why Warren Buffett the worlds 3rd Richest man hates gold as an investment “Today the world’s gold stock is about 170,000 metric tons. If all of this gold were melded together, it would form a cube of about 68 feet per side. (Picture it fitting comfortably within a baseball infield.) At $1,750 per ounce — gold’s price as I write this — its value would be $9.6 trillion. Call this cube pile A. “Let’s now create a pile B costing an equal amount. For that, we could buy all…

Which New Zealand Companies are making money in Latin America ?

When it comes to Latin America there are few New Zealand companies who know it as well as Tait Communications. The Christchurch-based business has been selling its products there for more than 25 years. So when Tait’s vice-president of sales for Latin America, Hamish Wiig, went on the John Key-led trade delegation recently he kept a watch out for some of his products. And it wasn’t long before he spotted some. “It was great to see the police at the Sao Paulo football stadium all using Tait digitally…

For Santander bank, “Brazil is the most important country in the world”

Banco Santander comes to buy. Sometimes we sell off something, but in Brazil we come to buy,” Botin told reporters before being received by President Dilma Rousseff, putting down rumours doing the rounds in the financial market that he might sell part of the Bradesco bank. “Brazil, for Santander, is the most important country in the world,” Botin said, adding that he was confident the Brazilian economy will bounce back. The banker announced investments of 3 billion Reais (some 1.5 billion dollars) in…

Chile, Brazil and Uruguay among the world’s leading exporters of wood chips

Wood chip exports from Latin America are on track to reach a record high of almost eight million tons in 2011, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly. This would be an increase of 7% from last year and of almost 60% higher than in 2006. Chile is by far the biggest exporter, accounting for two-thirds of the total shipments from the continent, while Brazil and Uruguay both account for about 16% each. In 2011, Chile was the world’s second-largest supplier of hardwood chips after Vietnam. Latin America’s hardwood…

Should you invest in Brazil?

I’ve just spent a very pleasant fortnight in Brazil. It’s a wonderful country. But should we be investing there? The first thing that struck me about Brazil its sheer abundance. It’s the fifth-biggest country in the world. It has 20% of the world’s freshwater supply and just 3% of its population. (China has over 20% of the world’s population and about 6% of its freshwater). It has the highest number of species of primates, amphibians and plants in the world and the most diverse…

Brazil to be among top destinations of foreign investment

Brazil will be one of the main destinations of foreign investment next year, a study released Wednesday by the country’s Institute of Applied Economic Research (IPEA) said. According to the International Perception of Brazil Monitor study, the indicator that measures the likelihood of Brazil receiving foreign investment rose from 35 points in May to 43 points in August. Seventy per cent of interviewees worldwide consider Brazil one of the top five destinations for foreign investment, up from 56 per cent…

Brazil’s dairy sector seeks a comeback

In 2008, Brazil looked well on its way to becoming a significant player on the world dairy market. Export volumes had more than doubled over a two-year stretch to 1.1 million tons. The country posted a record dairy trade surplus (more than 630,000 tons) when only six years earlier it had run a 1-million-ton deficit. The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy in its 2009 Global­ization Report called out Brazil as one of a handful of emerging nations that could eventually become dairy export players and provide low-priced…

Investment funds around the world seeking farmland in response to food price hikes

For decades, the world was often swimming in surplus food because farmers were so productive. But rising demand has caught up, and reserves have become so tight that global food markets are vulnerable to even minor shocks. Many analysts say that higher, more volatile prices may be here to stay. The new dynamic reflects in part the rising demand for commodities in developing countries such as China, India and Russia. By 2050, the U.N. Food and Agricultural Organization projects that world food production will…
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